Weaver's Fritillary (Boloria dia)

next page           back to list

2014 photographs highlighted in green. Click on any photograph to go to an enlarged picture, or simply scroll down the page.

7440_male_Alpes-Maritimes_25Jun07 25497_male_Alpes-Maritimes_08Jun11 35463_male_Var_18Jun14
36730_male_Var_11Sep14 36761_female_Var_11Sep14 27884_female_Côte-d'Or_26Jul11
34341_female_Var_10Sep13 5789_female_Var_26May07 36760_female_Var_11Sep14
 
16777_sex?_Var_25Jun09 8613_sex?_Var_27Jul07  

A relatively small fritillary, the upperside being superficially similar to the Pearl-bordered Fritillary (B. euphrosyne) and the Titania's Fritillary (B. titania) although easily distinguishable by the sharply-angled hindwing, more readily apparent from the underside shots, but as it quite often rests with wings wide open this can often be seen from the upperside (see 25497). Titania also has an angled hindwing, but to a lesser extent than dia, and titania is an altitude species, so any specimens at low altitudes are bound to be dia. It has a beautiful orange colour when fresh. The undersides of dia and titania are quite similar but can easily de differentiated on close examination.

The uppersides of dia and euphrosyne are quite similar but the dia wing shape is usually definitive.

It seems to be reasonably widespread throughout southern France as I have seen at least one at most places I have visited, and it was only in September 2006 that I found a location at 765m altitude in northern Var where it was common, and in this location each September it has been very common indeed. It seems to vary in size, often producing very small individuals, sometimes with very narrow wings. It is also (and perhaps more widely) known as the Violet Fritillary.

ref sex

observations

alt. m
7440 M a male, based on body shape (not 100% certain, though) and some subtleties of the black markings. Other subsequent photos on this page of males do, in fact, suggest that this is a female. 1080
25497 M a male, based on body length, and more heavily marked which is possibly an altitude effect. 1320
35463 M a male, with rather narrow wings (top to bottom) but rather wide across. It may be a second brood, as dia may be triple brooded in southern Var, the first brood appearing in April. 220
36730 M a male of the (probable) third brood. 220
36761 F a female of the third brood, with a rather suffused appearance. 36760 is the underside. 220
27884 F a female, quite dark and heavily suffused, but the low altitude indicates that this is not an altitude effect. 320
34341 F a female. 220
5789 F

a quite light and subtly-marked underside. It shows up the beautiful red-brown markings to good effect. I'm not sure why I originally thought this was a female, but a female upperside was photographed within 60 seconds, and so they may well be the same butterfly.

220
36760 F known to be a female from a view of the upperside (36761 is the upperside). The delicate violet marbling shows why its alternative name is perhaps more appropriate. 220
16777 M?

a fairly typical dia underside, midway between 5789 and 8613 in terms of strength of markings.

220
8613 M?

a very darkly-marked underside. The angularity of the hindwing is visible, and this is a clear pointer to dia. I am not sure whether it is male or female, possibly male based on the slightly territorial-looking pose.

780

 

7440_male_Alpes-Maritimes_25Jun07

 

25497_male_Alpes-Maritimes_08Jun11

 

35463_male_Var_18Jun14

 

36730_male_Var_11Sep14

 

36761_female_Var_11Sep14

 

27884_female_Côte-d'Or_26Jul11

 

34341_female_Var_10Sep13

 

5789_female_Var_26May07

 

36760_female_Var_11Sep14

 

16777_sex?_Var_25Jun09

 

8613_sex?_Var_27Jul07